Friday, May 7, 2010

Where to Get Information on Growing Hops in North Carolina

April morning in a Haywood County hop yard.
There are small hop yards being established all across North Carolina. As people start growing hops they find there is not a lot of information on how to grow hops commercially in the Southeast. Problems with insects, diseases, and soil fertility are common.  Fortunately, there is a team of people at NC State working on hops and creating a body of information to help. Here is where you can find some answers:
  • Sue Colucci, area agent in Henderson, Haywood and Buncombe counties, has a wonderful blog page devoted to hops. It is new, but it is already packed with information. Here is the link: http://wncveggies.blogspot.com/p/hops-information.html.
  • I have information on hops on my FAQ on ncherb.org at http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/herbs/FAQ/index.html#hops and regularly post updates on our hops research project on this blog at http://ncalternativecropsandorganics.blogspot.com/. You can quickly find the hops information here by clicking on "hops" under the labels in the right sidebar.
  • Rob Austin, Research Associate in Soil Science, has built a blog for our GoldenLeaf Foundation funded hops research project and he is putting lots of photos on there that you might find helpful. You can access that at http://spatial.soil.ncsu.edu/wordpress/.
  • Chris Reedy, Blue Ridge Food Ventures, has a blog for the new Eastern Hops Guild. He is trying to get eastern hops growers networked to exchange information, develop markets, and have purchasing power, etc.  Follow his blog at http://easternhopsguild.blogspot.com/.
  • In the very near future, we also hope to see recommendations for hops when you send in your soil samples to the NCDA labs!  A big thank you to them for all their help.
Hope this helps you all!

2 comments:

  1. Where in Alamance County are hops being grown?

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