Friday, November 22, 2013

Medicinal Herb Event: Focused on Harvesting, Washing, Drying, and Packaging

Medicinal Herb Growers: Special Event
Focused on Harvesting, Washing, Drying, & Packaging
December 14th from 9 to 4 in Mills River, NC

Many medicinal herb sales are lost because beautifully grown herbs are not properly washed, dried, or packaged. This workshop will be led by buyers from Gaia Herbs, Red Moon Herbs, and Strategic Sourcing along with Jeanine Davis and Alison Dressler from NC State University. This will be a small event so there can be lots of interaction been the growers and buyers. Bring your questions, samples of your herbs, and pictures of your facilities. We will also discuss GAPs, cGMPs, and how FSMA may affect your medicinal herb business. (If you don’t know what those acronyms stand for, you really need to be there!). Pre-registration is $20 which includes lunch (plus a $2.09 Eventbrite fee). Registration at the door is $30 and lunch is not guaranteed. The event will be held at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center in Mills River, NC. There are limited spaces available so please register early at our Eventbrite page.

If you are interested in sponsoring this event or having an exhibit table, please contact Alison Dressler at alison_dressler@ncsu.edu or call 828-684-3562 x150.

Register at:  EventBrite.

This workshop is partially funded by a grant from the GoldenLeaf Foundation.

Friday, October 4, 2013

Hops Growing Class Scheduled for October 28 in Asheville


Plan to join us in this class on growing hops that we are offering in cooperation with the Bionetwork. I know there is a lot of interest from people interested in growing on a hobby and commercial scale,  so here is a chance for people to learn from our research and from some of our most experienced NC hop growers.  Speakers will be Jeanine Davis and Kelly Gaskill from NCSU who manage the hops research program; Rita Pelczar and John Wright of Blue Ridge Hops in Madison County; and Highland Brewery.

Event: Growing Hops for Brewing
When: October 28
Where: A-B Tech, Enka Campus in Haynes 200 (Large Conference Room)
Time: 8 am to 4:30 pm
Cost: $53.70, includes lunch
Pre-registration required: http://hopsforbrewing.eventbrite.com

This class will give the hops grower and home brewer tools to optimize the quality, yield, and value of their harvest. We will look into the entire life cycle of hops production, from growing to marketing, and what brewers look for when purchasing. Topics will include: the current demand for locally grown hops; costs and returns; insect and disease management; optimal nutrients; and marketing suggestions. We'll also hear from an experienced local grower and brewer who will each provide their unique perspective from inside the industry.

The class will move to Highland Brewing Company at 3:00 for a tour of their facilities and a homebrewing discussion, transportation not provided.

This course is provided in collaboration with faculty from NC State University's Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center.

Registration includes lunch!

Held at A-B Tech, Enka in Haynes 200 (Large Conference Room)

Click here for directions.

Have questions? Contact the BioNetwork at biobusinessclasses@ncbionetwork.org or call 828-398-7943.

Here is the agenda:

8:30-8:45         Introductions, outline for the day-J. Davis
8:45-9:00         Background info-why all the interest-J.Davis
9:00-10:15       Hops 101: How to grow hops-J.Davis and K.Gaskill
10:15-10:30     Break
10:30-11:45     Growing organic hops: A grower’s perspective-R.Pelczar and J.Wright
11:45-12:30     Economics and marketing-R.Pelczar, J.Wright, and J.Davis
12:30-1:30       Lunch
1:30-2:30         Open discussion about how to get started, sharing experiences
2:30-3:00         Wrap up, evaluation
3:30-4:30         Highland Brewery-home brewing will be covered there

 

 

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Medicinal Herb Buyers and Growers Connect! What a Great Conference


On September 14, 2013 we held a historic conference in Asheville, NC.  A large group of us have been working for many years to help grow the western NC natural products industry, from seed to finished product. Some parts of that process have been moving along quite nicely, but we were still struggling with sourcing local raw materials for manufacturers. Buyers were looking for growers but didn't know where to find them and growers were looking for buyers and didn't have a clue who they were.

This event was designed to help connect current and potential medicinal plant growers with manufacturers and raw material buyers. It featured panels of new and experienced medicinal herb growers and natural products buyers/manufacturers to discuss their unique experiences, challenges, goals, and needs as it relates to natural products and raw materials. There was time for discussions between growers and buyers.  There was also a presentation on the new Blue Ridge Naturally branding effort, created to raise the awareness of the superiority of botanical raw materials and quality natural products (personal care, pet care, cleaning, tinctures and supplements, functional food and beverages) from the Blue Ridge Mountains region of North Carolina.

The event drew over 110 people and was, in my opinion, very successful. There was enthusiasm and lots of networking going on. The next step will be to design a way for growers and buyers to continue to network and form relationships. This will probably involve a web based program that everyone can subscribe to. Although there will be an open forum section, most agreed that there also needs to be a way that business transactions cam take place in a more private setting, probably with a trusted coordinator so buyers and growers could keep prices, quantities, and other business issues off the open forum. We used a similar model years ago and will try to build on what we did then.
People who attended the conference and many who could not make it asked for some kind of proceedings from the event. I took notes on my laptop as I moderated the event. All the panel participants agreed that making these notes available to the public would be helpful. Please keep in mind I was taking notes while moderating the event, so they are not professional proceedings and often written in short-hand, but they will give you a good idea of what took place at the meeting.

There will be follow-up events and actions, so stay tuned. If you want to discuss this more, please contact my employee who is leading this project: Alison Dressler, Alison_Dressler@ncsu.edu or 828-684-3562. Following this blog will help you stay current.
 

Can You Mix Serenade with Copper? Organic Farmers Want to Know


On several occasions this summer the question was posed to me if it was okay to mix the fungicide Serenade with copper. Serenade is a biological fungicide that is OMRI approved and can be used in certified organic production systems. I have used Serenade tank-mixed with copper for many years in my studies (Organic Heirloom Studies) and on my own farm. At an organic tomato workshop this summer, one of the attendees said that Serenade and copper should not be mixed together because the copper would inactivate the Bacillus subtilis in the Serenade, rendering it ineffective. When I returned to my office I did a Google search on the topic and indeed found two university extension articles and several non-professional articles that said the two products should not be mixed because the copper would inactivate the Bacillus subtilis.

Concerned that I might not be giving out the best information, I contacted my resident plant pathologist who passed my question on to the folks at Bayer CropScience.  Dr. Dennis Warkentin quickly responded, and with his permission, here is what he said,

 "...please be assured that it is perfectly fine to tank-mix Serenade and copper.  The Serenade product brands (ASO, Max, and Optimum) contain fungicidal lipopeptides and bactericidal molecules that are metabolites of the Bacillus, and production of these compounds is maximized during the fermentation process.  Our proprietary strain of Bacillus subtilis, QST 713, produces the highest level of lipopeptides of any other known strain.  When used as a foliar application, it is these metabolites – not the Bacillus spores -- that provide the protective benefit against pathogens on leaf and fruit surfaces.  The organism itself actually has a very short lifespan on foliar surfaces where it is exposed to UV light, and does not colonize above-ground plant surfaces.  (Serenade Soil, on the other hand, does sporulate in the soil in response to root exudates, colonizing growing roots and offering a physical protective barrier as well as extended lipopeptide production). 

The bottom line is, copper has no effect on the metabolic chemical ingredients of Serenade that are giving the disease protection, so has no detrimental effect on the product’s above-ground performance.  Inactivation of the Bacillus spores, whether it occurs or not, is of no concern."

Dr. Denise Manker, also of Bayer CropScience, asked me to add that that there is also no loss of foliar activity due to UV/sunlight.

So, those of us who find Serenade plus copper to be effective can continue to use it without concern that we are losing some activity as a result and others might want to try it out next season. Remember that according to the National Organic Program, copper must be used in a manner that minimizes accumulation in the soil.

And thank you to Dr. Warkentin and Dr. Manker for the speedy replies!

 

Friday, September 13, 2013

Pat Battle Speaking at Organic Broccoli Workshop-Sept. 17-Sign Up Now!


Our local Master Organic Farmer, Pat Battle, will be the main speaker at our second Organic Broccoli Workshop. Join us for a half-day devoted to broccoli. Complete with broccoli taste test and time in the field evaluating side shoot production in a participatory organic broccoli study.  Register now so we can have a lunch ready and waiting for you!

Event: Organic Broccoli Workshop and Field Day
Date:  September 17, 2013
Time:  10:00 am to 4:00 pm (bonus listening session runs till 5:00)
Location:   Mountain Research Station, 265 Test Farm Road,  Waynesville, NC 28786-4016.  A map with directions can be found at http://www.ncagr.gov/research/mrs.htm
Cost: $15

Are you interested in growing organic broccoli? Designed for the commercial grower, this workshop will also be of interest to the serious home gardener. We will start the morning with an organic broccoli taste test followed by presentations on the results from our participatory organic broccoli project, renowned organic grower, Pat Battle's perspective on growing organic broccoli, and the organic broccoli market situation. 

After a catered lunch, we will head out to the field to rate the side shoot production on our organic broccoli trial (this is the participatory part), followed by a visit to the large Eastern Broccoli Project field trials where new breeding lines are being tested. The latter is not an organic trial, but the new varieties should be of interest to everyone. Then we will return to the building for a moderated discussion on issues related to organic broccoli production, such as how to control harlequin bugs! The workshop will end at 4:00 pm, but Carolina Farm Stewardship Association is hosting a special focus group session afterward to get some feedback from growers on their new organic enterprise budgets (see below).
Registration:

Pre-registration is required and should be done online through the CFSA online store at the following link: 


First-time registrants in this system simply create a guest user name and password by clicking the “New Visitor Registration” link when prompted to login.

 You are welcome to show up the day of the event without pre-registration, but we might not have a lunch for you...so pre-registration is highly recommended!

The Organic Broccoli Project is led by Dr. Jeanine Davis with NC State University and funded by the Organic Farming Research Foundation. This workshop is being done in cooperation with Carolina Farm Stewardship Association.

SPECIAL POST TRAINING INVITATION TO FARMERS:
Carolina Farm Stewardship Association is developing enterprise budgets for organic vegetable commodity crops. Crops include 1) Broccoli, 2) Summer Squash, 3) Tomatoes, 4) Cabbage, 5) Watermelon, 6) Irish Potatoes, 7) Sweet Potatoes, 8) Greens, 9) Leaf Lettuce, 10) Cucumbers
If you grow any of these crops and can assist by reviewing drafts of a few budgets, we will be holding a focus group meeting at the end of each workshop in order to get feedback from farmers.  Please contact CFSA's Farm Services Director, Karen McSwain, (karen@carolinafarmstewards.org / cell: 828-423-2463) so that she can send you drafts of the budgets you are interested in reviewing prior to the workshop.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

UPS Medicinal Plant Conservation 2012 Award Jeanine Davis




I feel deeply honored to have been presented with this award from United Plant Savers. What a wonderful organization doing such important work.

From the United Plant Savers Journal of Medicinal Plant Conservation, Spring 2013 Edition:

"United Plant Savers is happy to announce that Jeanine Davis is the 2013 Medicinal Plant Conservation Award Recipient. Jeanine is a whiz at getting small farmers into specialty crops including medicinal plants. Her influence over the last two decades in North Carolina is legendary; just take a look at her amazing website: www.ncherb.org for resources for small organic farmers and how to grow guides for black cohosh (Actaea racemosa), bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis), Echinacea (Echinacea spp.), false unicorn (Chamaelirium luteum), goldenseal (Hydrastis Canadensis), and more to come. Jeanine is a big supporter of UpS, has taught at Planting the Future Events and recently helped coordinate the Ginseng Expo this past December."


Saturday, September 7, 2013

Do You Grow Medicinal Herbs? Rare Opportunity to Meet With Big Buyers!

I receive hundreds of contacts every year from people who are growing, or want to grow, medicinal herbs. The number one question is "How do I find a buyer?" Well, here is a rare opportunity for you to meet with a variety of IMPORTANT buyers in our region. These will include raw botanicals suppliers, manufacturers (large and small), and a nursery. Strategic Sourcing, Botanics Trading, Gardens of the Blue Ridge, Skinfare, and Red Moon Herbs will be there. We understand that Gaia Herbs and Botanical Supply will probably also have representatives present.

If you are growing or want to grow medicinal herbs on a commercial scale, please make every effort to attend this event. This won't happen again anytime soon. It is happening now because these buyers are LOOKING FOR LOCALLY GROWN MEDICINAL HERBS!!  Right now.

So, register today. The event is only one week away.  Hope to see you there!

What: Blue Ridge Naturally Workshop: Connecting Medicinal Plant Growers with Buyers
When: September 14, 2013, 10 AM to 4 PM

Where: AB Tech Enka Campus, Haynes Conference Center, Room 200 , 1459 Sand Hill Rd. Candler, NC 28715

Cost: $20 in advance; $25 at the door. Includes lunch catered by Gypsy Queen

On-line Registration: https://blueridgenaturally.eventbrite.com/ or contact Alison Dressler via email or at 828-684-3562 x 150.

Directions: http://www.abtech.edu/content/enka-conference-center/enka-conference-center-driving-directions

Natural products manufacturers are looking for medicinal herb growers and local medicinal herb growers are looking for buyers. But how do they find each other? This event will help connect current and potential medicinal plant growers with manufacturers and raw material buyers for the natural products industry in North Carolina. It will feature panels of four new and experienced medicinal herb growers and four natural products buyers/manufacturers to discuss their unique experiences, challenges, goals, and needs as it relates to natural products and raw materials. There will be ample time for networking between growers and buyers. If you are a grower, please bring a list of what you are growing, including quantities and what form you can supply them in (fresh or dried). If you are a medicinal plant buyer, please bring a list of what raw materials you want to source locally and in what quantity and form you need them.

We will also discuss the new Blue Ridge NaturallyTMbranding effort, created to raise the awareness of the superiority of botanical raw materials and quality natural products (personal care, pet care, cleaning, tinctures and supplements, functional food and beverages) from the Blue Ridge Mountains region of North Carolina.

If you are interested in becoming involved in the natural products industry in Western North Carolina, this event is not to be missed! While the event will focus on medicinal plant cultivation, wild-harvesters are welcome and encouraged to attend.

If you would like to set-up a product or informational table for $10, please contact Alison Dressler via email or at 828-684-3562 x 150.
This event is made possible by a grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation. Project partners include AdvantageWest, Bent Creek Institute, BioNetwork, Blue Ridge Food Ventures, NC Natural Products Association, NC State University, SBTDC, and US Botanical Safety Laboratory

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Organic Broccoli Workshop and Field Day on Sept. 17



Event: Organic Broccoli Workshop and Field Day

Date:  September 17, 2013

Time:  10:00 am to 4:00 pm (bonus listening session runs till 5:00)

Location:   Mountain Research Station, 265 Test Farm Road,  Waynesville, NC 28786-4016.  A map with directions can be found at http://www.ncagr.gov/research/mrs.htm

Cost: $15

Are you interested in growing organic broccoli? Designed for the commercial grower, this workshop will also be of interest to the serious home gardener. We will start the morning with an organic broccoli taste test followed by presentations on the results from our participatory organic broccoli project, renowned organic grower, Pat Battle's perspective on growing organic broccoli, and the organic broccoli market situation. 

After a catered lunch, we will head out to the field to rate the side shoot production on our organic broccoli trial (this is the participatory part), followed by a visit to the large Eastern Broccoli Project field trials where new breeding lines are being tested. The latter is not an organic trial, but the new varieties should be of interest to everyone. Then we will return to the building for a moderated discussion on issues related to organic broccoli production, such as how to control harlequin bugs! The workshop will end at 4:00 pm, but Carolina Farm Stewardship Association is hosting a special focus group session afterward to get some feedback from growers on their new organic enterprise budgets (see below).

Registration:

Pre-registration is required and should be done online through the CFSA online store at the following link: 


First-time registrants in this system simply create a guest user name and password by clicking the “New Visitor Registration” link when prompted to login.

 You are welcome to show up the day of the event without pre-registration, but we might not have a lunch for you...so pre-registration is highly recommended!

The Organic Broccoli Project is led by Dr. Jeanine Davis with NC State University and funded by the Organic Farming Research Foundation. This workshop is being done in cooperation with Carolina Farm Stewardship Association.

SPECIAL POST TRAINING INVITATION TO FARMERS:
Carolina Farm Stewardship Association is developing enterprise budgets for organic vegetable commodity crops. Crops include 1) Broccoli, 2) Summer Squash, 3) Tomatoes, 4) Cabbage, 5) Watermelon, 6) Irish Potatoes, 7) Sweet Potatoes, 8) Greens, 9) Leaf Lettuce, 10) Cucumbers

If you grow any of these crops and can assist by reviewing drafts of a few budgets, we will be holding a focus group meeting at the end of each workshop in order to get feedback from farmers.  Please contact CFSA's Farm Services Director, Karen McSwain, (karen@carolinafarmstewards.org / cell: 828-423-2463) so that she can send you drafts of the budgets you are interested in reviewing prior to the workshop.

Friday, August 23, 2013

Bioenergy-Biofuels Crops Field Day on Sept. 4




Event:              Western North Carolina Bioenergy Field Day

Date:              September 4, 2013

Time:               12:30 Registration, 1:00-5:00 Educational Presentations and Demonstrations

Contact:           Ron Gehl, ron_gehl@ncsu.edu, 828-684-3562 x129

North Carolina State University and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services invite you to attend this event designed to provide a time for researchers to share the latest information of the work being conducted on energy crops in Western NC.  Tours of research plots and processing equipment demonstrations will help growers, researchers, and private industry interests learn how we are working to meet the state’s renewable fuels and energy goals of the future.  The afternoon event will cover topics including the science of cellulosic fuel production, production of energy grasses, cultural management of bioenergy crops, high-oil crops and biodiesel production, sorghum production for biofuels, breeding efforts  and genetic improvements of biomass crops. Speakers include NC State University researchers in Soil Science, Horticultural Science, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, and Forestry and Environmental Resources, and biofuel industry representatives.  Field demonstrations will include small-scale gasification, oilseed crushing and biodiesel production, and sorghum harvest, squeezing, and distillation.  The field day is free and open to the public.  For more information, please visit http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/events/2013-bioenergy-field-day/index.html or contact Ron Gehl at ron_gehl@ncsu.edu of 828-684-3562 x129.

Sept. 14 Event to Connect Medicinal Herb Growers with Buyers in the Region


What: Blue Ridge Naturally Workshop: Connecting Medicinal Plant Growers with Buyers

When:  September 14, 2013, 10 AM to 4 PM

Where: AB Tech Enka Campus, Haynes Conference Center, Room 200 , 1459 Sand Hill Rd. Candler, NC 28715

Cost:    $20 in advance; $25  at the door. Includes lunch catered by Gypsy Queen

On-line Registration: https://blueridgenaturally.eventbrite.com/ or contact Alison Dressler via email or at 828-684-3562 x 150.

Directions: http://www.abtech.edu/content/enka-conference-center/enka-conference-center-driving-directions

Natural products manufacturers are looking for medicinal herb growers and local medicinal herb growers are looking for buyers. But how do they find each other?  This event will help connect current and potential medicinal plant growers with manufacturers and raw material buyers for the natural products industry in North Carolina. It will feature panels of four new and experienced medicinal herb growers and four natural products buyers/manufacturers to discuss their unique experiences, challenges, goals, and needs as it relates to natural products and raw materials. There will be ample time for networking between growers and buyers. If you are a grower, please bring a list of what you are growing, including quantities and what form you can supply them in (fresh or dried). If you are a medicinal plant buyer, please bring a list of what raw materials you want to source locally and in what quantity and form you need them.

We will also discuss the new Blue Ridge NaturallyTM branding effort, created to raise the awareness of the superiority of botanical raw materials and quality natural products (personal care, pet care, cleaning, tinctures and supplements, functional food and beverages) from the Blue Ridge Mountains region of North Carolina.

If you are interested in becoming involved in the natural products industry in Western North Carolina, this event is not to be missed! While the event will focus on medicinal plant cultivation, wild-harvesters are welcome and encouraged to attend.

If you would like to set-up a product or informational table for $10, please contact Alison Dressler via email or at 828-684-3562 x 150.

This event is made possible by a grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation.  Project partners include AdvantageWest, Bent Creek Institute, BioNetwork, Blue Ridge Food Ventures, NC Natural Products Association, NC State University, SBTDC, and US Botanical Safety Laboratory

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Do You Want to Produce Biodynamic Vegetables Commercially? A Survey for the Industry


Brad's Raw Foods is VERY interested in working with growers in western North Carolina to produce an abundance of biodynamic vegetables for their product line. I have also heard from other organic food processors that are interested in starting biodynamic lines to sell through Whole Foods.

On August 1, we held a Biodynamic Opportunities Workshop at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center in Mills River, NC. Sponsored by Brad's Raw Foods and NC State University, Jim Fullmer of Demeter, the biodynamic certifying association and Coach Mark Smallwood with Rodale Institute shared a wealth of information about transitioning to biodynamic agriculture, the certification process, and the economic opportunity that is developing right now in our area.

If you are interested in potentially growing commercial biodynamic vegetables and/or just want to learn more about it, please take a few minutes to fill out this survey (if you didn't attend the workshop, just skip the first few questions). This will give us the information we need to estimate how much can be produced in this area next season. It will also put your name and email address on our biodynamic email list for notices about future meetings and requests for product. Everyone who takes the survey will have their name entered into a drawing for the book "The Polytunnel Handbook" by Andy McKee and Mark Gatter.

Link to Survey

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Acetic Acid (Vinegar) as an Herbicide



I was having a discussion with a colleague about organic agriculture the other day and the subject of weed control came up. Here is western North Carolina weed control is one of the major challenges in an organic system. He made the comment that there are no effective organic herbicides. I have tested a number of commercial organic herbicides and wasn't too impressed. The biggest problem I had with those herbicides was that for them to be effective they needed to be applied when the weeds were very small. I invariably missed that narrow window of weed size for effective control.

But in the past two years I've been reading about and hearing from growers about the effective use of vinegar for weed control. I remember trying household (5% acetic acid) vinegar years ago and not being impressed, but higher concentration products are now available. But do they really work?  Is there research to back it up?  I quick search of the literature (internet) showed that they can indeed be effective.

The study that I think demonstrated this very clearly and simply is this one from Cornell Extension:
Evaluation of acetic acid based herbicides for use in broad-spectrum turfgrass and weed control

Here is one from Canada:
Acetic Acid for Weed Control in Organic Potato

Another from Cornell University
Vinegar for Weed Control in Bell Pepper and Broccoli

And one by researchers in Egypt and Florida
Natural Herbicides

Friday, August 9, 2013

Sharing News Reports on the NC Beer and Hops Scene!

Kelly Gaskill studying the hops in our research hop yard. You can see how there are big differences in varieties. Compare the variety she is standing next beside to the one behind her. I know which one I would want to be growing!

I was reading my news clippings today and there were so many on beer and hops in NC in recent days, I just had to share.  What a happening place we are.  And the research hop yard got lots of attention at the Tomato and Vegetable Field at the research station yesterday, too.  Here are links to those articles and one radio piece:

Beer Brewing School Opening at Rockingham Community College

Fullsteam Brewery in Durham Looking for Locally Grown Hops

Sierra Nevada Brewery in Mills River Will Start Test Brewing Next Month

Farmers Hopping on Beer Bandwagon

Beer Camp Across America 2014 to Include Mills River Brewery

Monday, August 5, 2013

Organic Tomato Production Workshop-with farm visit and grafting demo


CFSA and NC State University Present:
 
Commercial Organic Tomato Production: 
Practical Strategies from Regional Organic Growers

 
When: August 15, 2013: 8:30 am—4 pm
Where: Meet at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center. 455 Research Drive, Mills River, NC 28759 
Directions at: www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/directions2.html
What: We will spend time in the field and greenhouse at The Living Web Educational Farm and In the classroom at the Research & Extension Center for this In-Depth Workshop.
Our focus will be on strategies to overcome common pitfalls in organic tomato production and disease management. This workshop is intended for commercial producers, so speakers will assume participants have a healthy baseline knowledge. Plenty of Time for questions!

Speakers:
Patryk Battle & Marshall Hagan (Living Web Farms): On-Farm Tour and Discussion, From seed to harvest. 
Jeanine Davis (NC State University Alternative Crops & Organic Extension Specialist): Tomato Production Systems Overview
Amanda Sizemore (Organic farmer, Cane Creek Farm): Disease Management
Tom Elmore (Organic farmer, Thatchmore Farm): Grafting Techniques

Cost: $12 (lunch from Laurie’s Catering) 

Registration Details: To register, you will need to access the CFSA online store (along linked above): https://netforum.avectra.com/eweb/Shopping/Shopping.aspx?Site=CFSA&WebCode=Shopping&cart=0

*Note: If you are a first-time registrants in our system, simply create a guest user name and password by clicking the “New Visitor Registration” link when prompted to login.

If you are a CFSA members or already in our system but you don't remember your password, click on the "Forgot your password?" link and follow the instructions. This will send an email to you, resetting your password so you can get into the system and register

Questions? Please seek the appropriate contact:

Registration: Anna MacDonald Dobbs: anna@carolinafarmstewards.org919-542-2402

Workshop content: Eric Soderholm, eric@carolinafarmstewards.org, 252-482-0696

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Tomato and Vegetable Field Day at Research Station in Mills River


Photo by Steve Schoof
 
Annual Tomato and Vegetable Field Day

Date and Time:  Thursday, August 8, 2013 starting at 12:30 pm
Location:  Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station, 74 Research Drive, Mills River, NC 28759. 
For More Information: Contact Jeanine Davis at Jeanine_Davis@ncsu.edu or 828-684-3562 

Western North Carolina is well known for producing high quality tomatoes, sweet corn, cucumbers, peppers, and other vegetables. Agricultural scientists with NC State University provide support to these growers by developing new varieties and researching the best practices to grow safe, nutritious vegetables that can yield a profit for the farmer while protecting our mountain soil and water. To help diversify agriculture in the region, they are also exploring potential new crops such as hops for the craft breweries and medicinal herbs for the natural products industry. The field day will open with a trade show, tomato taste test, and registration.  Participants will then tour the research station on event trailers (with comfortable seats and protection from the sun). The event will conclude with a pig pickin’ at 6:00 pm at Lake Julian (about 10 minutes away). The field day will take place regardless of the weather, so dress accordingly. This is a free event sponsored by NC State University, the NC Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services, the NC Tomato Growers Association, and the industry.

Directions to the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station: From I-40 in Asheville, take I-26 South (Exit 46). Travel approximately 9 miles to Hwy 280 (Exit 40). Follow Hwy 280 South approximately 2 miles to Ferncliff Park Drive on the right. Turn right onto Ferncliff Park Drive (used to be Old Fanning Bridge Rd.).  At the entrance to Ferncliff Park, turn left onto Old Fanning Bridge Road. Cross the river and turn right onto Research Drive. IF THERE IS A ROAD CLOSED SIGN AT FERNCLIFF PARK DR., FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS BELOW.

Revised temporary directions to the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station:  Construction of the Sierra Nevada Brewery near our facilities resulted in a temporary road closure. Old Fanning Bridge Road at Hwy NC-280 has been renamed to Ferncliff Park Drive. If that road is still closed on the Hwy NC-280 side at the time of the field day, people coming in from I-26 should follow these directions: continue south on Hwy NC-280 past Ferncliff Park Drive.  At the third light, turn right on Hwy NC-191 (Old Haywood Road).  Go several miles and turn right on Old Fanning Bridge Road.
Research Stops:
  • Incidence and Persistence of Salmonella & Escherichia coli in Environmental Samples from North Carolina Tomato Production Systems
  • Tomato Taste Test: Ensuring Good Flavor in New Varieties
  • Sweet Corn Yields from a Long Term Tillage & Production Management Experiment
  • Effects of Organic and Conventional Production Systems under Conservation and Conventional Tillage on Water Quality
  • Examining the Feasibility of Hops as a New Crop for Western North Carolina: A Variety Trial 
  • Seed Source Effects on the Growth, Yield and Biochemical Composition of the Medicinal Herbs Echinacea purpurea and E. angustifolia
  • Evaluating Fungicides for the Management of Early Blight, Late Blight, and Phytophthora Blight
  • Tomato Variety Replicated Trials 2013
  • Comparison of Foliar versus Drip Irrigation Application of Insecticides on Pepper and Cucumber
  • Tomato Insecticide and Miticide Trial
  • Cucurbit Downy Mildew: Prepare, Predict, Prevent
  • NC Comments on Proposed Produce Safety Rules

 

Monday, July 15, 2013

Event: New Opportunities for Biodynamic and Organic Farming in Western NC





Event:  New Opportunities for Organic and Biodynamic Farming in Western NC

Date:   August 1, 2013

Time:   2:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Where:  Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center, 455 Research Drive, Mills River, NC 28759

To reserve a space: Call Erin at 267-372-0339

Description: There are new business opportunities for organic and biodynamic production in western North Carolina and this is the event to learn all about them!  Jim Fullmer from Demeter, the biodynamic certifying organization, will discuss what is involved in being a commercial, certified biodynamic farmer.  “Coach” Mark Smallwood the executive director of the Rodale Institute will discuss their plans for western North Carolina. And Jeanine Davis, Associate Professor of Horticulture at NC State University will lead a panel discussion to cover the rising demand for large-scale organic and biodynamic vegetables from the region.  This event is sponsored by Brad’s Raw Foods, Demeter, NC State University, and Rodale Institute.

Detour: Construction of the Sierra Nevada Brewery near our facilities has resulted in a temporary road closure for road widening.  Old Fanning Bridge Road is closed on the Hwy NC-280 side; that is the direction most people come in on from I-26.  So, to get to our facilities from I-26, continue south on Hwy NC-280 for several miles.  Turn right on Hwy NC-191 (Old Haywood Road).  Go several miles and turn right on Old Fanning Bridge Road. 

For more information, contact Jeanine_Davis@ncsu.edu  or Erin at 267-372-0339.

After Dinner Party:  Join us for an after dinner raw chocolate, kombucha, and biodynamic wine garden party by: Ashevilleage Institute starting at 8:00 pm at 80 Buchanan St., Asheville, NC 28801 (come around to the back!)

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Late Blight Confirmed in Asheville, NC


Late blight alert:
 
Dr. Kelly Ivors, plant pathologist at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center in Mills River sent out this alert this evening:

Late blight was detected in a West Asheville tomato garden. It is now in our general area. Details on the disease can be found here:
http://plantpathology.ces.ncsu.edu/2013/07/pest-news-late-blight-found-in-north-carolina/
And details on how to manage it, can be found here:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Tomato_late_blight_ki.pdf

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From Jeanine Davis:
There is a good article by Dr. Margaret McGrath, plant pathologist at Cornell University on late blight on tomatoes and potatoes in organic production.  It can be accessed here:
http://www.longislandhort.cornell.edu/vegpath/organic_late_blight_management.pdf

In western NC, we have had some success in the past with holding off late blight by alternating copper and Serenade.  Some organic growers have reported success with alternating copper, Serenade, and Regalia.  As both of the pathologists point out in their articles, however, these products have to be present on the foliage before the late blight spores land on the leaves. With all the rain we are having, it is making it very difficult to keep spray materials on the foliage.

Good luck, everyone!


Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Volunteers Needed to Help Us in Our Woodland Herb Demonstration Area!


You are Invited to Help with the Woodland Botanicals Clean-Up!

Many of you have been out to tour our beautiful woodland medicinal plant demonstration area at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station. The heavy summer storms have made a mess and we need a lot of extra hands to help clean up debris so we can keep offering walking tours and mini-workshops. This is an opportunity to see these woodland botanicals up close and personal, exchange knowledge with other interested individuals, and learn more about our current research and education efforts.

The volunteer work day will be July 16th starting at 9 am. Please bring work gloves, water, and wear appropriate clothing. You can pack a lunch and we can eat in one of the conference rooms in the Center. Come for an hour or two or spend the day with us.

 Please meet in the gravel parking lot to your left as you enter the Research Station (this is the facility down near the river where the greenhouses are). Note, the construction of the Sierra Nevada Brewery near the research station has resulted in a temporary road closure. If you come in via I-26 please follow these directions to get to our facility:
Old Fanning Bridge Road is closed on the Hwy NC-280 side. So, to get to our facilities from I-26, continue south on Hwy NC-280 for several miles. Turn right on Hwy NC-191 (Old Haywood Road). Go several miles and turn right on Old Fanning Bridge Road. The research station will be on your left (74 Research Drive, Mills River, NC 28759).

Questions? Please contact Margaret Bloomquist at margaret_bloomquist@ncsu.edu or 828-684-3562 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting x257.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Hops Variety Trial Tour-Friday, July 12

Tour the NC State University
Hops Variety Trial!
Friday, July 12, 2013
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station
Mills River, NC
 
 
In direct response to the expressed needs of hops growers in North Carolina, three years ago we established a hops variety trial at the research station in western North Carolina. Ten varieties were planted on a 20 foot trellis.  The first year (2011), we had one of the prettiest hop yards in the Southeast.  The second year (2012), Downy Mildew, spider mites, and Japanese beetles took a terrible toll on the plants and the differences between varieties really became apparent. We lost one variety completely; Newport.  Downy Mildew actually killed the crowns. This spring we took the opportunity to informally test a few new varieties by planting them where the Newport crowns had been planted.  This year we have taken a much more aggressive approach to controlling diseases and insects.  We have also done some cultural practices, such as spring pruning in an effort to increase lateral formation and yields.
 
So, come on out late Friday afternoon.  Take a look at these varieties and let's share our experiences growing hops in western NC. As many of our longer-term growers will attest, research such as the variety trial here is so important to the success of this industry.  It can help you, the grower, prevent some costly mistakes.  When a variety, spray material, or practice doesn't work in our yard, it is "lesson learned for all of us". When it doesn't work in your yard, it is time and money lost.
 
Note, the construction of the Sierra Nevada Brewery next to the research station has resulted in a temporary road closure.  If you come in via I-26 please follow these directions to get to our facility:
 
Revised temporary directions to the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center and the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station:  Construction of the Sierra Nevada Brewery near our facilities has resulted in a temporary road closure for road widening.  Old Fanning Bridge Road is closed on the Hwy NC-280 side; that is the direction most people come in on from I-26.  So, to get to our facilities from I-26, continue south on Hwy NC-280 for several miles.  Turn right on Hwy NC-191 (Old Haywood Road).  Go several miles and turn right on Old Fanning Bridge Road.
 
No registration is required. This is an outside event, so dress accordingly. Suggested donation of $5 per person.  If you have questions, please email or call Kelly Gaskill, Kelly_Gaskill@ncsu.edu or 828-684-3562.

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Our Annual Tomato and Vegetable Field Day in Mills River



Mark your calendars!

August 8, 2013
Annual Tomato and Vegetable Field Day
Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station
Mills River, NC
This annual field day will highlight all the tomato, vegetable, and specialty crop research being conducted by NC State University researchers. The event will open with a trade show and registration at 12:30 pm.  The program will start at 1:00 pm and run till 5 or 5:30.  Attendees will ride around the research station on wagons to all the research stops, so come prepared to be outside.  If the weather cooperates and we have ripe fruit, we will have a tomato taste test for the heirloom-type hybrid tomatoes that Dr. Panthee has developed. We will include our hops and Echinacea research on this field day.  The event will conclude with a pig pickin’ at Lake Julian.  This event is sponsored by the North Carolina Tomato Growers Association. Directions:
http://www.ncagr.gov/research/MountainHortDirections.htm

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Wild Herb Weekend is Next Month-Register Now (Jeanine's favorite conference!!)

Wild Herb Weekend is just around the corner on July 26-28th, 2013. This is an amazing weekend in the beautiful high mountain location of Valle Crucis, NC. There is something for everyone at this intimate, little conference held at the historic Valle Crucis Conference Center. Whether you grow  herbs for a hobby, use herbs for healing, or want to start a commercial herb operation, you will find many interesting sessions and hands-on workshops and plant walks to participate in.  This year our keynote speakers will be Phyllis Light and Matthew Wood.  The scenery is breathtaking, the lodging is historic (a bit rustic, shared facilities, bring a fan), the food is good, and the company is outstanding. We have so much fun!!

Key Note Speakers:
Matthew  Wood has been a practicing herbalist since 1982. helping tens of thousands of clients over the years. In addition to his practice based traditional Western herbalism, he has lectured throughout United States, Canada, Scotland, England, France, and Australia. He is also the author of six acclaimed books on herbal medicine: Seven Herbs, Plants as Teachers, The Book of Herbal Wisdom,  The Practice of Traditional Western Herbalism,  The Earthwise Herbal, A Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants , The Earthwise Herbal, A Complete Guide to New World Medicinal Plants.

Phyllis Light is a fourth generation herbalist and natural health educator for over 25 years. At the age of 10, her grandmother and father taught her to identify and use local plants from the woodlands of northern Alabama, her home. Her initial training was in the traditional Southern and Appalachian Folk Medicine of the region, though she has continued her studies and acquired a wide range of experience with herbs, clinical herbalism and other healing modalities. She has taught and lectured at herb schools, universities, hospitals, and natural health conferences.
Important Registration Information:
Mail-in registrations must be postmarked by July 1st, 2013.
Online registrations will be accepted until July 19th, 2013.
Walk-in registrations will be accepted on site between 4:30pm - 5:30pm on July 26th, 2013.
 
Register on-line on the NC Herb Association website .  Questions? Please direct all Wild Herb Weekend inquires to info@ncherbassociation.org or call 828.237.1052.  

Speakers and Presenters and Full Class Descriptions are included below.

Speakers and Presenters

Jane Abe came to Western North Carolina in 2001 after a 30-year career as a science teacher and school counselor. Always interested in science and healing, she studied herbal medicine and has completed a master's degree in holistic nutrition. She teaches classes in the Asheville area and at Mills Garden Herb Farm in Statesville. Through her teaching, Jane hopes to help others return to traditional healing methods with whole foods and herbs. She is currently on the NCHA board and was editor of the newsletter.

Michele Collins, RH (AHG), MPH has been practicing as a clinical herbalist for more than seven years, using traditional Chinese medicine in combination with Chinese, western, and Ayurvedic herbs, Chinese nutritional therapy, and qi gong. She is currently in private practice at the Naturopathic Health Clinic in Winston Salem, NC and at the Awaken Wellness Clinic in Elkin, NC. As an herbalist, she likes connecting people to the beauty and magic of plants and to the healing rhythms of nature.  She has a general practice, with particular experience in the use of tonic herbs and formulas to address chronic depletion and imbalances caused by illness or emotional trauma, psychological/ mental health issues, digestive issues, as well as gynecological issues. Michele is a graduate of Michael and Leslie Tierra's professional herbalist program at the East West School of Herbology, where she holds the designation as a certified herbalist (EWCH) and has a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree in Health Behavior from the UNC School of Public Health. In 2011, she spent six months studying Chinese herbal medicine in an integrated setting in Chengdu, China. . In 2012, she joined the staff of the Academy of Integrated Medicines where she teaches western and Ayurvedic herbalism in their Integrated Herbal Studies Certificate Program.

Dr. Jeanine Davis is an associate professor and extension specialist in the Department of Horticultural Science with NC State University.  She is located at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center in Mills River, right next to the Asheville airport.  For over 20 years, her program has been focused on helping farmers increase their profitability by diversifying into new crops and organic agriculture.  Medicinal herbs are a specialty of hers and she shares her knowledge on the topic with coauthor, Scott Persons, in the book "Growing and Marketing Ginseng, Goldenseal and Other Woodland Medicinals".   Current research and extension efforts are with organic woodland botanicals, hops, truffles, and heirloom tomatoes.  She is also establishing a new organic research program headquartered at the Mountain Research Station in Waynesville, NC.  Jeanine is a founding board member of the Organic Growers School and the NC Natural Products Association and serves as an advisor to the NC Herb Association and NC Tomato Growers Association.  Jeanine is passionate about what she does and shares her information at numerous conferences and workshops in North Carolina and beyond.  She also maintains several websites (ncherb.org, ncorganic.org, and ncspecialtycrops.org), and keeps folks current on her activities and areas of interest through Blogger (ncalternativecropsandorganics.blogspot.com), Facebook (facebook.com/people/Jeanine-Davis/1442912228, and Twitter (twitter.com/JeanineNCSU).

Camille F. Edwards is a master herbalist in keeping tradition within the family.  She can trace her family roots all the way back to Nicholas Culpeper, the famous herbalist! While studying herbs it came to light that without spiritual and emotional healing, first and foremost, most illnesses will remain in place. She expanded her education and recently completed her PhD in Philosophy. Upon completion of her doctorate she immediately enrolled in Hypnotherapy school and is now a certified Hypnotherapist and Reiki Master. She is a also business partner of Soulful Sages and works full time as a legal assistant to support her herbal habits.  She currently heads up the Chapter section for the North Carolina Herb Association and is once again serving on the Board having once served as Past President of the North Carolina Herb Association.

Jane Fitch is a Certified Holistic Life Coach, Clinical Hypnotherapist, Certified Vision Board Coach, Certified Hormone Consultant, and Certified NLP Therapist. She holds a BBA from Texas A&M University in Marketing and a PhD in Metaphysical Psychology.  She worked in a private practice with clients specializing in chronic illness, depression and weight management, and has mentored under Dr. Wayne Dyer, Marianne Williamson, and Deepak Chopra.  She combines alternative healing practices with a variety of techniques to create a truly holistic healing experience. 
Rachel Frezza is an astrologer, certified flower essence practitioner, clinical herbalist and advanced energy healer practicing in West Asheville, NC.  She is passionate about plant spirit medicine and the natural healing ways of incorporating astrology with herbal healing. In these classes she is excited to share her knowledge of Flower essences with you!  She has a ferret Shatavari and hopes someday to journey to the Andes and Himalayan Mountains.

Ryan Marie Kelly has always had a fascination with the intrinsic nature of things, and this interest has led her into various pursuits including science, yoga, and all things plant related.  She is currently working on an NIH grant funded project with Botanipharm, researching the medicinal qualities of goldenseal and developing research grade material that can be utilized for rigorous scientific endeavors. Her work with Botanipharm is an extension of her belief that the natural products world needs resource material that is reliable and consistent, where the entire process; from the soil, to the growers, to the plant, to the medicine maker, and eventually to the consumer, is treated with respect and diligence.  She also enjoys sharing yoga with people and volunteers her time at Asheville Community Yoga.  Her yoga style incorporates flow movement with Taoist principles.  In addition, she serves on the board of The North Carolina Herb Association. 

Marie Knight is a laboratory technician and a science enthusiast.  Trained in molecular biology and biochemistry, her 12+ years in the lab includes experience in analytical chemistry, environmental toxicology, and microbiological testing.   Her interest in herbs is linked both to her love of science as well as to her continuous pursuit of good health in the great outdoors.  An avid runner and hiker, Marie has gotten to know the mountain botanicals and medicinal weeds she encounters on the trails.  When not running or drawing, she is the Quality Assurance Specialist with BioNetwork and works in the lab at A-B Tech near Asheville.

Phyllis D. Light, a fourth generation Herbalist and Healer, has studied and worked with herbs, foods and other healing techniques for over 30 years. Her studies in Traditional Southern Appalachian Folk Medicine began in the deep woods of North Alabama with lessons from her grandmother, whose herbal and healing knowledge had its roots in her Creek/Cherokee heritage. Phyllis' studies continued as an apprentice with the late Tommie Bass, a nationally renowned folk herbalist from Sand Rock, Alabama, as well as other herbal Elders throughout the Appalachians and the Deep South.

Janice Maleyeff is a Holistic Healing Practitioner who interlaces her intuition and the universal healing energies of herbs and essential oils in her Reiki practice, providing you with a total body, mind and spirit experience.  She is a certified Angel Blessings Intuitive, a teacher of esoteric philosophy, tarologist, Reiki Master, certified in spiritual aromatherapy, chakra therapy and crystal healing, an herbalist, and artist.   Contact Janice can be reached at 704.910.6109 or at soulfulsages@gmail.com to schedule an appointment or one of her many workshops.

Jeff Rieves has been a gardener his entire life, though in his younger days, often a reluctant one. Jeff brings years of experience to any class he teaches. His time as managing partner of Southernwood Farm gave him the opportunity to spend 20 years with his hands in the soil of Chatham County, NC. And his experience is in the classroom as well. Jeff taught at Central Carolina Community College, instructing aspiring farmers in the mysterious ways of business. As an original instructor of CCCC's Sustainable Farming Program, Jeff helped develop a curriculum that now teaches students from all over the US.

Mechell A. R. Turner BA. M.ED. IBCLC (ret.2006) CCH. She has Bachelor and Master's from Campbell University and owner of Simply Herbal in Peachland, NC. She is a lactation consultant, childbirth educator and clinical herbalist specializing in herbs and alternative remedies for childbirth and breastfeeding.  She has published in journals and contributing writer to other breastfeeding books. She currently teaches birth classes privately, and biology for Shanan Classic tutors near Charlotte, NC. Mechell is a Board Member of NCHA and member of the American Herbalists Guild.

CoreyPine Shane, RH (AHG), is Director of the Blue Ridge School of Herbal Medicine and for the past 20 years has helped clients by artfully blending Chinese and Western herbal traditions with a focus on local plants. As a seasoned wildcrafter he has extensive knowledge of local plants as well as medicine making. He has taught at many national conferences, written on herbal medicine, and is a professional member of the American Herbalists Guild. CoreyPine believes that laughter is an essential part of any medicine chest, which is why he is a part of the "Wise Guy" school of healing.

Matthew Wood has been a practicing herbalist since 1982. In a period when many authors and lecturers are merely "arm chair herbalists" who offer theories and opinions based on book learning, and others have turned to the exotic traditions of India or China, he has been an active practitioner of traditional Western herbalism. He has helped tens of thousands of clients over the years, with many difficult health problems. While Matthew believes in the virtue of many other healing modalities, he has always been inspired to learn, preserve, and practice the tradition of herbal medicine descending to us from our European, Anglo-American, and Native American heritage. He is a member of the American Herbalists Guild (registered herbalist) and has earned his Masters of Science degree from the Scottish School of Herbal Medicine (accredited by the University of Wales).

Marc Williams is an ethnobotanist. He has studied the people plant connection intensively while learning to employ botanicals for food, medicine, and beauty. His training includes a Bachelors degree in Environmental Studies concentrating in Sustainable Agriculture from Warren-Wilson College and a Master's degree in Appalachian Studies concentrating in Sustainable Development with a minor in geography and planning from Appalachian State University. He has spent over a decade working at a multitude of restaurants, various farms and travels throughout 23 countries in North/Central American and Europe. Marc has taught hundreds of people about the marvelous world of plants, people and their interfaces. His greatest hope is that this information may help improve our globally challenging ecological situation
Class Descriptions

Animal Medicines, Plant Medicines (Matthew Wood) This is a deeper extension of the 'doctrine of signatures.'  When a plant looks like an animal or is used by an animal it is especially powerful.  This is called a 'spirit signature.'  We will discuss bear, badger, elk, deer, rabbit, snake, and crow medicines.  This teaching helps us to understand the deeper connections between the creatures in Nature and comes to us from Native American medicine.

Beat the Summer Heat with Food, Herbs, and Qi Gong (Michelle Collins) The food we eat affects our body in profound ways and is an important tool for regulating energy levels and maintaining balance between the mind, body, and spirit. This workshop draws on the Chinese Medicine's knowledge of how the cycles of nature are mirrored in our own bodies.  You will learn about how to use foods and herbs, as well as some simple sound and movements of qi gong practice to promote health and well-being during the heat of summer.

Echinacea: What an Amazing Plant and So Easy to Grow (Jeanine Davis)  It's medicinal and ornamental and should be in everyone's garden. Let's look at all the different kinds and varieties of Echinacea you can grow, learn how to grow it, and talk about the new opportunities to grow it on a large scale here in the Southeast. And we'll make an Echinacea tea for you to take home.
Exotic Invasive, Yet Oh So Good... (Marc Williams) In this class we will take a walk and discuss how one can effectively turn a problem into a resource by harvesting some of our most perniciously exotic invasive plants for a plethora of powerful uses.

Fermenting Fresh Vegetables (Jane Abe with Madge Eggena) Fermentation is an easy and wonderful way to preserve the abundance of summer. Healthful bacteria act on vegetables giving us familiar products such as sauerkraut and pickles. The live cultures in these foods become part of the community of 100 trillion microbes that call us "home," and play a critical role in our overall good health. This class will introduce you to the basics of preparing these delicious treats, and we'll offer many samples to get you inspired!

Garden work session (Jeff Rieves) We will do some clean up and maintenance of the Dick Tippett Herb Garden. Bring your pruners, a trowel, and your favorite story about Dick to the garden. We will have some tools available for heavier work, but if you have the space in the car, bring a shovel or rake with you. See you in the garden!

Gentle Flow Yoga (Ryan Marie Kelly) Treat yourself to a little relaxing action on your afternoon break with yoga!  All levels are welcomed and encouraged. We will start off with some deep breathing and gentle movement to grease the joints of the body, and then keep the energy flowing for an easy-breezy, but active, class.  No crazy headstands or pretzel configurations, just a little movement and breath work with a nice space for deep relaxation at the end.  Please bring a mat or a blanket if you have one but don't stay away if you don't (we will have some extras).

Good Neighbors (Jeff Rieves) Just like people, some plants thrive in the presence of certain other plants, and languish near others. We'll look at a select palette of plants and see which of them deserve a new place in your garden!

Growing Hops for Personal Use or as a Commercial Venture (Jeanine Davis) Everyone is talking about hops, but can we really grow them in this area? Sure we can! Learn how to grow a few hops in pots to brew your own beer, as a lovely trellised plant in your garden for making medicine, or to produce on a scale large enough to sell local craft breweries.  And we'll make a small hops craft, too.

Healthy Aging (Phyllis Light) The key to healthy aging is a healthy lifestyle. Join Phyllis as she explores ways to age gracefully, be healthy, and stay connected. We'll discuss changing nutritional needs, herbal approaches, what to do about weight gain, sex drive and chronic diseases and how to maintain a positive attitude. Remember, you're only as old as you feel.

The (He)Art of Herbal Entrepreneurship  (Jeff Rieves) Most people think of entrepreneurs as simply business owners. True entrepreneurs are some of the most innovative, passionate people in the world. In the same way that herbalists learn their craft, they can also develop many of the skills of the successful entrepreneur. Discover what those skills are and find out how YOU can put them to use in your business or practice TODAY.

Herbal and Other Aids for a Good Night's Sleep! (Camille Edwards) Come join Camille as she presents a list of well-known and perhaps not so well-known herbal remedies for getting a good night's sleep. Herbal blends will be discussed and made available for tasting!  Also, discussion will involve other aids, including self-hypnosis, to accompany your herbal tea for a good night's sleep! 

Herbal Quality Control:  Methods of Analysis (Marie Knight) Meeting the documentation standards for regulatory compliance and having a sound quality assurance program often means gaining familiarity with analytical testing.  If you've seen the acronyms TLC, HPLC, or GC on an herbal Certificate of Analysis, but aren't sure exactly what they mean, you aren't alone!  In this class, we'll go through some of the test methods commonly used to establish identity, purity, potency, and safety of botanical material.  The focus will be more on the principles and the process behind the testing rather than specific regulatory requirements.  While some of the material will be technical in nature, the class is intended for an audience of non-scientists.

Herbal First Aid Around the Home (CoreyPine Shane) First Aid remedies are some of the most useful herbal remedies to know for those "just in case" moments. We will talk about commonly available herbs including some kitchen spices to treat shock, pain, stomach ache, bee stings, and more. You will learn how to put together your own first aid kit as well as how to use herbs you already have or that grow in your yard for fast treatment.

Herbingo (Jane Abe with Madge Eggena) Play Herbingo and sharpen your plant identification skills.  Participants are encouraged to help each other out, so everybody learns.  There will be lots of great prizes to reward the lucky winners!

Herbs and Food for Your Ayurvedic Dosha Type (Michelle Collins) Ayurveda literally means the science of life, and offers wisdom and insight into how your unique physical constitution influences what foods and herbs can best promote health and well-being.  In this session, you will learn more about the three doshas and take a simple quiz to help you determine your dosha type.  You will also learn how to tailor your food and herb choices for your dosha type to help maintain health and well-being. 

A Journey in Shamanism: Nature's Spirit Helpers (Janice Maleyeff & Camille Edwards)  We will be utilizing the "Keeper of the Cauldron" technique to shift our consciousness to discover the power of plants, rocks, elements, and our animals and their significance and connection with us. This workshop will also include a review of the herbs and oils to enhance spiritual healing in our daily lives, and a closing ceremony honoring our ancestors and expressing gratitude to Mother Earth - All with DRUMMING! Since this will be held outdoors, please bring any drums and rattles for energy and a notepad for knowledge.

Let's Grow Stevia! (Jeanine Davis) Stevia is increasingly popular as a healthy, natural sweetener. Learn about the botany, history, uses, and production of stevia. We'll discuss growing it in our gardens and the research NC State is involved in to make it a commercial crop in the Southeast. We will also make a simple stevia product to take home.

Making Amazing Herbal Tinctures (CoreyPine Shane) Hands-on medicine making class. Additional $5 fee. Making your own herbal extracts is a surprisingly simple process. All you need is a postal scale and you can be making your own alcohol extracts of herbs, creating fresh high-quality tinctures for a fraction of what you pay in the store. Together we will make fresh and dry plant tinctures and each participant will take home a small batch for themselves.

The Medicine Side Show (Mechell Turner) Take a look at patent herbs, snake oil, root medicines and healing on the run.  From the old west side show, to big Pharma, even herb companies, has the medicine show disappeared or has it just grown more sophisticated?  In today's world of the quick fix how do we herbalists fit in and can we heal or help on the fly?  Can we still heal on the road as we travel? 

Mending a Broken Heart (Mechell Turner) Take a look at the cardiovascular system basic anatomy and herbs for its health and healing. From the time the heart first beats till death and even transplanting them for keep beating how do we keep our hearts healthy along with those veins and arteries? We will look at herbs, oils, and even meditation and other healing modalities for our human hearts and emotions.

Nature's Practical Magic! (Janice Maleyeff and Jane Fitch) Learn "Nature's Practical Magic!" A workshop where we will co-create our own personal blends with intention! Magical plants and oils help focus your creative energy to realize your dreams.  This workshop promises a "cauldron" full of magical plants, and lots of suggestions on how best to use them in teas, oils and more! Create a "magical" spray to cleanse and clear your aura!  This workshop is a favorite! $5.00 charge 

Qigong  (Jane Fitch) Get your day started with positive energy flow.  Experience Qigong - an easy and powerful exercise movement that anyone can do. 

The Science of Fermentation: Experiments in Zymology (Ryan Marie Kelly) This class will detail the specifics of what is happening "behind the scenes" with the fermentation process. We will discuss how the story unfolds on the microscopic level and how this affects the macroscopic final product.  Different applications of fermented processes will be discussed, as will different ingredients and their purposes. This class is for the curious minds that wonder about the science and history of zymology (fermentation science) and for the hungry bellies that enjoy sampling the results!

Signs of the Times: Astrology for Health (Phyllis Light) Fire, Earth, Air, Water ~ The Signs in the Heavens and the four elements can serve as traditional guideposts for health and prosperity. The core principle of health astrology is based on assignment of Zodiac signs and heavenly bodies to different parts of the body. Understanding the influence of planetary changes can be an integral aspect of a health plan. Join Phyllis in a discussion of the 12 signs, the 4 elements and their effects on the body and on health ~ A fun and informative class!

The Six Tissue States (Mathew Wood) A simple, clear introduction to the 'forgotten energetics' that lie behind traditional Western herbalism.  The tissues can be irritated or excited (too prone to heat), depressed (cold, underactive), atrophic (dry, hardened), stagnant (damp, toxic), tense (physical or psychological tension), and relaxed.  Our Western remedies and formulas naturally fit these categories: sedatives, coolants  (excitation), stimulants, aromatics (depression), mucilages, emollients, oils, tonics (dry, atrophic), alteratives and laxatives (stagnation), relaxants (tension), and astringents (relaxation).

Supernatural Sodas and Magical Meads (Marc Williams) In this class we will take a trip through the ancient art of brewing beverages. We will talk about various drinks while also crafting a mead and reviewing step by step directions for making your own special brews. This class will empower each student to reclaim the wonder of uniquely created concoctions to please any palate!

The Tao of Tea (Mechell Turner)   Hidden within the leaves and roots of plants is this thing we call tea. There are rituals, medicines, healings, revolutions and gifts surrounding just an herb and water. Discover the gifts, history and rituals surrounding this comfort measure for the soul.

The Taste of Herbs (Phyllis Light) Come taste, savor and guess the name of the herbs. This class will explore a proving of three different simple decoctions based on their taste. Together we'll discover what that taste has to say about the medicinal properties of the plant and how the plant can be used. This is a hands-on, or rather, tongue-on, experiential class. You'll be surprised how much information a simple taste can reveal.
 
The Three Selves of the Shamans (Mathew Wood) Learning to understand and integrate the conscious self, the animal self, and the dream self.  The importance of the personal medicine animal or animal spirit, which provides sensation and sight for both the physical and the dream selves.  A psychology of shamanism that can be used with herbal medicine.

Time to Indulge Yourself with Nature's Potions- Herbal Skincare (Janice Maleyeff with Jane Fitch) Join me on this hands-on workshop. Learn to identify a selection of herbs, essential oils and carrier oils that have a special affinity for our skin. This workshop includes learning to pamper yourself from your head to your toes the "natural" way. You will learn to make hair rinses, anti-aging serums, facial steams, clay masks, body powders and wonderful scrubs with ingredients from around the World!  Make a sugar or salt scrub with your own unique fragrance! $5.00 charge

Wonderful Woodies (Marc Williams) In this class we will have the opportunity to focus in on trees and shrubs collectively known as woody plants. We will take a walk and talk about proper identification as well as uses for food, medicine and beauty.

The Woodland Garden - a PowerPoint Plant Walk (Jane Abe & Madge Eggena) Take an "armchair" plant walk and get acquainted with NC woodland medicinal plants, shrubs and trees. Many of these species are endangered, so learning to recognize, value, rescue, and grow them is of great importance.  If you have a little shady area, it can be the beginning of your woodland garden, which will bring you great joy, especially in spring.

Woods Walk to the Waterfall (CoreyPine Shane) Come explore the amazing diversity of medicinal plants in the woods up the hill from the conference center, which includes many deep woodland medicinals, both common and uncommon. Be aware that this is a bit of a hike, but pays itself off in great plants and ends up at a small waterfall. Bring good shoes.